He’s a uniter, not a divider

When a selection of prominent conservatives pen articles like these and Washington Monthly prints them…

  • Let’s quit while we’re behind

    What a wrench it must be for him to pick up his paper every morning and read the now-daily debate about whether his son is officially the worst president in U.S. history.

  • Bring on Pelosi

    As a conservative who’s interested in the long-term health of both my country and the Republican Party, I have a suggestion for the GOP in 2006: lose.

  • And we thought Clinton had no self-control

    This must all be shocking to my Republican friends who still believe our country would be a better place if our party controlled every branch of government as well as every news network, movie studio, and mid-American pulpit. But evidence suggests that divided government may be what Washington needs the most.

  • Give divided government a chance

    Bush soon employed such monarchial power to detain a few citizens and to frighten would-be dissenters, and Republicans in Congress either cheered or fiddled like Nero while the Constitution burned.

  • Restrain this White House

    In 200 years of U.S. history, every one of our conflicts involving more than a week of ground combat has been initiated by a unified government.

  • Idéologie has taken over

    As Bush’s ideology leads from one disaster to another, one might ask: How far can it go? It has already brought us to Baghdad, an adventure so hopeless that Buckley recently mused, “If you had a European prime minister who experienced what we’ve experienced, it would be expected that he would retire or resign.” The more we learn about what happened behind the scenes in the months leading up to the war in Iraq, the more apparent it becomes that evidence was twisted to fit preconceived notions. Those who produced evidence undermining the case for war were ignored or even punished. It was zealotry at its most calamitous.

  • The show must not go on

    Conservatives are as angry as I have seen them in my nearly five decades in politics. Right now, I would guess that 40 percent of conservatives are ambivalent about the November election or want the Republicans to lose.

…it’s time to start wondering whether the permanent republican majority might be a little less than permanent.

Go down, Howard Dean! Go down!

Published by

Ragged Clown

Based in San Jose, California

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