Atheists for Jesus

A positive post about religion for a change.

I just read this op-ed piece about Jesus in The Guardian.

I think there are three powerful elements in what we know about his teaching that are enduringly important and have lessons for us today. The first was his attitude towards the laws and customs by which we have chosen to organise ourselves. He did not believe they should be afforded absolute, unchanging authority over us. They were created to assist us in leading the good life, but he knew that if they were not held lightly, and with a shrewd appreciation of their provisional nature, they could easily became stupid and tyrannous.

This is the hardest thing for me to understand about the prevalent forms of Christianity in today’s America. When a liberal, atheist like me reads what Jesus actually taught, we want to punch the air and say “Amen, brother!”.

I just find it so difficult to reconcile what I know about Jesus’s teaching with what his latter-day followers advocate.

Published by

Ragged Clown

Based in San Jose, California

6 thoughts on “Atheists for Jesus”

  1. I am starting to come around to your idea that it should be moderates vs. extremists, not religion vs. non. I have always agreed that some of the ideas the bible laid out were honorable in intent, but the effect thus far has been fairly disasterous. I am sure that the problem largely stems from the fact that people enjoy power over other people, and an easily mis-interpretable text from a supposed infallable source is a pretty good opportunity for that.

  2. The movie Dogma has an appropriate line about people taking some good ideas and making it into some concrete thing when they were only useful as good ideas – -referring to modern religions of course.

    The Gospels in the new testament would seem to totally defy a lot of the rest of the bible if looked at from the type of life that Jesus advocated. The problem to me, as usually is the case, is that some large percentage of people seem too busy to think it through themselves, and they also happen to be bad at picking people to trust on those subjects. Coupled of course with Aaron’s comments about power and corruption.

    Another problem occurs when people think that these ideas which are part of their moral code can’t exist outside of that system. I think that is called a part-whole fallacy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *